Technically, caffeine is a drug. Although the source of caffeine can make a difference in the effects it has on your body, high levels of caffeine can be linked to toxicity. Reduction in daily caffeine intake can lead to reduction in anxiety and stress responses as well as a reduction in toxicity. Take this quiz to determine your level of caffeine toxicity. 

Each of the following is worth on point.

Do you consume on a daily or weekly basis: 

1. caffeinated coffee 

2. iced tea 

3. black or green tea 

4. herbal teas containing black tea 

5. colas containing caffeine 

6. Mountain Dew

7. chocolates or chocolate coated candy bars 

8. chocolate milk 

9. cookies containing chocolate chips 

10. chocolate malts, shakes, and/or sodas 

11. chocolate covered ice cream bars 

12. coffee flavored candy and/or ice cream 

13. cookies flavored with cocoa or vanilla 

14. chocolate or vanilla flavored cake 

15. ice cream flavored with cocoa or vanilla 

16. candy bars containing vanilla bean extract 

16. chocolate or vanilla pudding 

18. chocolate mousse

19. brownies or fudge 

20. almond bark 

21. cappucino 

22. hot chocolate 

23. Dr. Pepper 

24. Are you currently taking asthma medication? 

25. Do you consume drugs which contain caffeine? 

26. Do you have a history of endometriosis and/or fibrocystic breast disease? 

27. Do you have a history of kidney/liver disease? 

28. Do your hands tremble after consuming caffeinated substances? 

29. Do you become nervous, moody, and/or agitated after consuming caffeinated beverages? 

30. Do you develop a headache, or do you become irritable if you fail to get your caffeine fix? 

31. Do you binge on and/or crave chocolate? (for heavy chocolate eaters add an additional 4 points) 

32. Do you drink 6 or more cups of coffee per day?

Total:_____

1-6 points: Mild Caffeine Toxicity. 

7-15 points: Moderate Caffeine Toxicity. 

16-23 points: Severe Caffeine Toxicity. 

24 and above: Extreme Caffeine Toxicity. 

 

(Gunja & Brown, 2012).

(Peters, 1966). 

(Kendler, et. al 1999). 

For more information, check out our research and references page here